Posts Tagged ‘cholesterol’

Drinking Earl Grey tea helps prevent heart disease

Friday, April 11th, 2014

pic_02_240x240_apr11A new study has revealed that drinking Earl Grey tea could help tackle heart disease .

According to the researchers, the key ingredient in Earl Grey tea, bergamot extract, was found to lower cholesterol and guard against a disease that causes more than a quarter of all deaths in the UK.

The study revealed that the fragrant Mediterranean fruit, which gives Earl Grey its unique flavour, contains enzymes known as HMGF (hydroxy methyl glutaryl flavonones), which can attack proteins in the body known to contribute to cardiovascular disease.

The scientists added that a dietary supplement of HMGF could be just as effective as statins in combating low-density proteins (LDL) or “bad” cholesterol.

The study was published in the Journal of Functional Foods.

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Eating lentils can help reduce bad cholesterol

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

pic_01_240x240Eating beans, peas, chickpeas or lentils daily can reduce bad cholesterol

A new study has revealed that eating one serving a day of beans, peas, chickpeas or lentils can significantly reduce “bad cholesterol”.

The study, led by Dr. John Sievenpiper of St. Michael’s Hospital’s Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, has found that by eating one serving a day of pulses, people could lower their LDL (“bad”) cholesterol by five per cent.

According to Sievenpiper, the reduction of bad cholesterol would lead to a five to six per cent reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease.

The study also revealed that pulses have a low glycemic index (meaning that they are foods that break down slowly) and tend to reduce or displace animal protein as well as “bad” fats such as trans fat in a dish or meal.

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Knowing your heart age could help prevent CVD

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

arti_06_240x240_mar27Thanks to the identification of the common risk factors involved and national public health initiatives, heart disease deaths have almost halved over the past 40-50 years, especially in high income countries.

But “despite impressive progress, there is much still to be achieved in the prevention and management of cardiovascular care, with no room for complacency,” according to researchers.

CVD “is by far and away the leading cause of deaths worldwide,” and is “rampant” in low and middle income countries, while the surge in obesity and diabetes threatens to overturn the steady decline made in CVD prevalence, the researchers said.

And rates of heart disease continue to vary substantially depending on where a person lives and how well off s/he is.

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Exercise reduces insulin resistance: Dr. Kovil

Monday, March 24th, 2014

crop2_240x240_24mar14Dr. Rajiv Kovil is a Consultant Diabetologist at Dr. Kovil’s Diabetes Care Centre, the first Preventive Diabetes Centre & Diabetic Foot Clinic in Mumbai, KLS Memorial Hospital and Holy Spirit Hospital among others. He is a founder member of United Diabetes Forum, a forum of practising diabetologists in India. He has also written various articles on diabetes for medical journals such as Asian Journal of Diabetology and Medical Image.

His Preventive Diabetes Centre & Diabetic Foot Clinic is an initiative to provide preventive diabetic measures as well as to function as a specialized Foot Clinic for diabetic patients not only in terms of equipment but more importantly in terms of expertise.

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4 steps to thinking healthy revealed

Monday, March 17th, 2014

crop1_240X240_17MAR14Intuitive healer Inna Segal in her book ‘The Secret of Life Wellness: The Essential Guide to Life’s Big Questions’ has highlighted four steps that can help you in your aim to think healthy.

Segal said that many people have a complicated relationship with their looks, shaped by past hurt, fear, guilt, anger or frustration, but that could be repaired in four steps, which all work to confront negative emotions and change the way one thinks, News.com.au reported.

First step is that one should focus on improving their confidence, standing up for themselves, setting better boundaries and question their motivation.

Step two is releasing the emotion, for example when one has identified the feeling, they should try to physically release it. One technique is to do exercise like running, boxing or dancing.

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Halve the amount of sugar in diet: WHO

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

saf_01_240x240_feb12Under new World Health Organization guidance, people are advised to halve the amount of sugar in their diet.

The recommended sugar intake will stay at below 10 percent of total calorie intake a day, with 5 percent the target, according to the WHO.

The suggested limits apply to all sugars added to food, as well as sugar naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit concentrates, the BBC reported.

UK campaigners say it is a “tragedy” that the WHO has taken 10 years to think about changing its advice.

The recommendation that sugar should account for no more than 10 percent of the calories in the diet, was passed in 2002.

It works out at about 50g a day for an adult of normal weight, the WHO said.

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Exercising regularly reduces risk of cancer, CVD

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014

saf01_240x240_feb17A new study has found that exercising regularly keeps our heart healthy and even reduces the risk of developing cancer and other diseases by targeting the heart cells’ powerhouses – the mitochondria.

Eduard Sabido, Francisco Amado and colleagues explain that despite the well-documented benefits of exercise, the exact way that it helps the heart is not well understood. Sure, it helps strengthen the heart muscle so it can pump more blood throughout the body more efficiently.

And people who get off the couch and exercise regularly have a reduced risk of developing heart problems and cardiovascular disease.

One estimate even claims that 250,000 deaths every year in the U.S. are at least partially due to a lack of exercise, but how this all happens in the body at the molecular level has perplexed researchers – until now.

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Know these five numbers to keep your heart healthy

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

saf_03_240x240_feb12Apart from pass codes, phone numbers, social security numbers, clothing sizes and addresses, heart experts at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center suggest that there are five more you need to know to help keep your cardiovascular system healthy.

“These are the numbers doctors use to assess someone’s risk for getting heart disease, both short term and throughout their lifetime,” Dr. Martha Gulati, director of preventive cardiology and women’s cardiovascular health at Ohio State’s Ross Heart Hospital, said.

“When you monitor these numbers, you are empowered to work with your doctor to improve your heart health,” she said.

Gulati said that the most important numbers to know are blood pressure levels, Body Mass Index, waist circumference, cholesterol levels and blood sugar levels.

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How a fibre-rich diet averts obesity and diabetes

Monday, January 20th, 2014

food2_240x240_17jan13It has been known for year that a fibre-rich diet protects the organism against obesity and diabetes, and not a French-Swedish team of researchers has succeeded in elucidating this mechanism, which involves the intestinal flora and the ability of the intestine to produce glucose between meals.

The study also clarified the role of the intestine and its associated microorganisms in maintaining glycaemia. They will give rise to new dietary recommendations to prevent diabetes and obesity.

Most sweet fruit and many vegetables such as salsify, cabbage or beans are rich in so-called fermentable fibres. Such fibers cannot be digested directly by the intestine but are instead fermented by intestinal bacteria into short-chain fatty acids such as propionate and butyrate, which can in fact be assimilated by our bodies.

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10 steps to beat alcohol blues

Friday, January 10th, 2014

saff_03_240x240Scientists have suggested a simple ten step approach to help you keep an eye on your alcohol intake so that you can maintain a healthy lifestyle despite your love for drinking.

Jurgen Rehm from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Canada, and David Nutt, Neuropsychopharmacologist from Imperial College London, have created an integrated set of evidence-based strategies focusing on what individuals and governments can do to reduce the personal and public costs of alcohol.

The first four points focus on personal health behaviour. Nutt and Rehm suggest that the first step is monitoring alcohol intake by knowing your numbers in much the same way you would know your BP or calorie intake.

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