Posts Tagged ‘exercise’

Eat sensibly, eat often and eat local: Rujuta Diwekar

Monday, April 7th, 2014

DSC_0957-240x240-dec30Winner of the ‘Nutrition Award’ from Asian Institute of Gastroenterology, Rujuta Diwekar is amongst the most qualified and sought after practitioners in India today and the only nutritionist to have accreditation from Sports Dietitians, Australia.

In the plethora of diet fads and fears, Rujuta’s voice rings loud and clear, urging us to use our common sense and un-complicate the act of eating. Her two books have sold more than 5 lakh copies and have been translated in more than 5 languages. Her 3rd book on exercise “Don’t lose out, work out!” is out in the markets and already in the best seller charts. She has also made a film “Indian food wisdom & the art of eating right” which is available on dvd.

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Heart responds differently to exercise in men and women

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

crop2_240x240_2apr14Researchers have said that the formula for peak exercise heart rate that doctors have used for decades to diagnose heart conditions may be flawed as it does not account for differences between men and women.

The simple formula of “220 minus age” has been widely used to calculate the maximum number of heart beats per minute a person can achieve.

Many people use it to derive their target heart rate during a workout. Doctors use it to determine how hard a patient should exercise during a common diagnostic test known as the exercise stress test.

After analyzing more than 25,000 stress tests, the researchers found significant differences between men and women and developed an updated formula to reflect those nuances.

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Simple tape measure better calculator of obesity than BMI

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

crop1_240x240_25mar14Experts have revealed that a simple tape measure can help you calculate obesity better than the lengthy and often confusing current body mass index (BMI).

Dr Jude Oben, from the Obesity Action Campaign, told Sky News that measuring waist size was a more accurate assessment of someone’s fat and less “tedious” than calculating BMI.

The fat inside your abdomen is a good indicator of your metabolic risk, and a tape measure can do the measuring, he said.

Oben said that men and women should keep their waist – measured at the level of the belly-button – below 35.5 inches and 31.5 inches respectively.

Source: ANI
Image: Getty Images

Exercise reduces insulin resistance: Dr. Kovil

Monday, March 24th, 2014

crop2_240x240_24mar14Dr. Rajiv Kovil is a Consultant Diabetologist at Dr. Kovil’s Diabetes Care Centre, the first Preventive Diabetes Centre & Diabetic Foot Clinic in Mumbai, KLS Memorial Hospital and Holy Spirit Hospital among others. He is a founder member of United Diabetes Forum, a forum of practising diabetologists in India. He has also written various articles on diabetes for medical journals such as Asian Journal of Diabetology and Medical Image.

His Preventive Diabetes Centre & Diabetic Foot Clinic is an initiative to provide preventive diabetic measures as well as to function as a specialized Foot Clinic for diabetic patients not only in terms of equipment but more importantly in terms of expertise.

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Tips to improve your heart health

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

image_1_240x240mar04Even though heart disease remains the leading cause of death, the good news is that it can be prevented.

Judith Mackall, MD, Cardiologist at University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio, offers three tips for men and women to help improve their heart health and reduce the risk of developing heart disease.

She advises thirty minutes of moderate exercise every day, which can have a big impact on heart health.

If 30 minutes is too much time to dedicate all at once, no problem! Breaking up exercise into ten minute increments, three times a day, has just as great an effect. In fact, within ten weeks, results have shown that an individual’s cholesterol numbers will improve, blood pressure will come down, and weight will decrease.

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Exercising regularly reduces risk of cancer, CVD

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014

saf01_240x240_feb17A new study has found that exercising regularly keeps our heart healthy and even reduces the risk of developing cancer and other diseases by targeting the heart cells’ powerhouses – the mitochondria.

Eduard Sabido, Francisco Amado and colleagues explain that despite the well-documented benefits of exercise, the exact way that it helps the heart is not well understood. Sure, it helps strengthen the heart muscle so it can pump more blood throughout the body more efficiently.

And people who get off the couch and exercise regularly have a reduced risk of developing heart problems and cardiovascular disease.

One estimate even claims that 250,000 deaths every year in the U.S. are at least partially due to a lack of exercise, but how this all happens in the body at the molecular level has perplexed researchers – until now.

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Strength training helps tone body: Vinod Channa

Monday, February 17th, 2014

vin01_240x240_feb17Vinod Channa is a Mumbai based Personal Trainer with over 20 years experience in the fitness industry. He is often called upon by popular celebrities, world class atheletes and active business professionals for his expertise in weight loss management, general fitness, functional strength training, corrective exercise, sports performance training, nutrition and body sculpt. He has won a gold medal in Mr Mumbai in 2008.

Vinod’s clientele list include many Bollywood celebrities like Ritesh Deshmukh, John Abraham, Sohail Khan, Genelia D’Souza Deshmukh, Shilpa Shetty Kundra, Raj Kundra and many more as well as leading businessmen like Vikas Behal, Ajgaonkar Builders and Kiran Kulkarni.

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How motor skills decline as you get older

Friday, February 14th, 2014

old_240x240_feb13Researchers have found that motor function declines in people as they get older because there are certain “set points” in the nervous system that are determined during development but can be reset with age.

Scientists from the School of Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio observed a change in set point that resulted in significantly diminished motor function in aging fruit flies.

Study senior author Ben Eaton, assistant professor of physiology at the center, said that the body has a set point for temperature (98.6 degrees), a set point for salt level in the blood, and other homeostatic (steady-state) set points that are important for maintaining stable functions throughout life.

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Yoga lowers fatigue and inflammation in breast cancer survivors

Monday, February 3rd, 2014

ffdd_03_240x240A new study has revealed that practicing yoga for as little as three months can reduce fatigue and lower inflammation in breast cancer patients.

At the six-month point of the study- three months after the formal yoga practice had ended- results showed that on average, fatigue was 57 percent lower in women who had practiced yoga compared to the non-yoga group, and their inflammation was reduced by up to 20 percent.

The participants had completed all breast cancer treatments before the start of the study and only yoga novices were recruited for the randomized, controlled clinical trial.

Participants practiced yoga in small groups twice a week for 12 weeks. Women making up the control group were wait-listed to receive the same yoga sessions once the trial was over. During the study, they were instructed to go about their normal routines and not to do yoga.

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Enjoying life helps to keep you fit

Friday, January 24th, 2014

Family-Cycling_240x240A new study has revealed that people who enjoy life maintain better physical function in daily activities and keep up faster walking speeds as they age, compared with people who enjoy life less.

A study of 3199 men and women aged 60 years or over living in England looked at the link between positive well-being and physical well-being, following participants over 8 years.

Researchers Dr. Andrew Steptoe said the study showed that older people who are happier and enjoy life more show slower declines in physical function as they age.

“They are less likely to develop impairments in activities of daily living such as dressing or getting in or out of bed, and their walking speed declines at a slower rate than those who enjoy life less,” Steptoe added.

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