Posts Tagged ‘Health’

Sughavazhvu: Rural healthcare in India

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

food_240A healthcare system for rural India, dubbed Sughavazhvu, which stands for ‘happy life’ in Tamil, is gaining popularity thanks to it’s use of innovative techniques for providing accessible and appropriate primary healthcare.

The techniques involve epidemiological solutions, alternative human resource models, advanced technological platforms and comprehensive health financing.

Zeena Johar , a key Penn Nursing partner and co-founder of SughaVazhvu Healthcare, said that with 75 percent of Indian medical practitioners positioned at urban locations and 72 percent of the Indian population residing in rural locations, there is an overarching need for human resource innovation for delivering health.

According to IKP Centre for Technologies in Public Health, India is home to 1.25 billion people and rural care facilities – often the first point of contact for primary care and gatekeepers to secondary care providers – face a near chronic shortage of professional health workers.

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Breast and prostratic cancers are common in India: Dr. Vasishta

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

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Dr. VG Vasishta is the founder & CEO of SBF Healthcare & Research Centre Pvt Ltd. Wg Cdr (Dr) VG Vasishta (Retd) joined the Army Medical Corps as a specialist medical officer with a passion to serve the country. However, the best in him was reserved for something better. He was instrumental in designing and implementing clinical studies to evaluate the use of Sequentially Programmed Magnetic Fields (SPMFTM) in treatment of arthritis and Cancer.

In the last seven years Dr. Vasishta has treated over 5000 cases (both cancer and arthritis patients) using this therapy. SBF Healthcare has centers in Bangalore and Mumbai and are the only centers that offer the modality of treatment pioneered by him.

Dr. VG Vasishta answered Sify readers’ queries related to the above in an exclusive chat. Read the transcript below.

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Drinking Earl Grey tea helps prevent heart disease

Friday, April 11th, 2014

pic_02_240x240_apr11A new study has revealed that drinking Earl Grey tea could help tackle heart disease .

According to the researchers, the key ingredient in Earl Grey tea, bergamot extract, was found to lower cholesterol and guard against a disease that causes more than a quarter of all deaths in the UK.

The study revealed that the fragrant Mediterranean fruit, which gives Earl Grey its unique flavour, contains enzymes known as HMGF (hydroxy methyl glutaryl flavonones), which can attack proteins in the body known to contribute to cardiovascular disease.

The scientists added that a dietary supplement of HMGF could be just as effective as statins in combating low-density proteins (LDL) or “bad” cholesterol.

The study was published in the Journal of Functional Foods.

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Why sleep is essential for your memory

Friday, April 11th, 2014

pic_01_240x240_apr11Researchers have claimed that infants who nap are better able to apply lessons learned to new skills, while preschoolers are better able to retain learned knowledge after napping.

Rebecca Gomez of the University of Arizona said that sleep plays a crucial role in learning from early in development.

A growing body of research shows how memories become reactivated during sleep, and new work is shedding light on exactly when and how memories get stored and reactivated.

In Gomez’s new work, she and he team are examining how young children can recognize instances similar, but not identical, to something they have learned and apply it to a new situation – so-called generalization. Examples in language include the ability to recognize the letter “A” in different types of font, understanding a word regardless of who is speaking it, or recognizing a grammatical pattern in a sentence never before heard.

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Turmeric: The new superfood!

Friday, April 11th, 2014

pic_03_240x240_apr11Researchers have said that turmeric could protect against a host of brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr Michael Murray, co-author of the Textbook of Natural Medicine and one of the world’s leading authorities on natural medicine, said that various spices in Indian curries are used not only for their flavour, also but for their medicinal properties, News.com.au reported.

He said that since inflammation is a major factor in the development of most chronic degenerative diseases including cardiovascular disease, allergies, type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease, curcumin’s anti-inflammatory power holds great promise in all of these conditions and many more.

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Metabolic Syndrome: A growing epidemic in a corporate setting

Friday, April 11th, 2014

pic_02_240x240Indeed, today poor fitness, metabolic crisis and stress have reduced proficiency and well being in all levels of corporate professionals.

Statistics indicate that 90% of the employees show a distorted blood profile and metabolic syndrome in corporate settings. Health education is poor and awareness negligible, travelling and eating at restaurants is imperative in some settings. A sedentary lifestyle, stress and absence of well-being often come free with attractive corporate packages.

In such a scenario, it becomes imperative that corporate introduce integrated Lifestyle medicine and holistic interventions with components of nutrition therapy, exercise science, cognitive behaviour strategies and other alternative approaches for their employees. Health Promotion as well as holistic programs fixing the widely prevalent metabolic syndrome, as well as providing thorough skills to eat right on tours, work on portion size, perform simple exercises, especially breathing exercise regimens and muscle stimulation routines, while travelling need to be accessible by employees of all cadre.

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Eating lentils can help reduce bad cholesterol

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

pic_01_240x240Eating beans, peas, chickpeas or lentils daily can reduce bad cholesterol

A new study has revealed that eating one serving a day of beans, peas, chickpeas or lentils can significantly reduce “bad cholesterol”.

The study, led by Dr. John Sievenpiper of St. Michael’s Hospital’s Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, has found that by eating one serving a day of pulses, people could lower their LDL (“bad”) cholesterol by five per cent.

According to Sievenpiper, the reduction of bad cholesterol would lead to a five to six per cent reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease.

The study also revealed that pulses have a low glycemic index (meaning that they are foods that break down slowly) and tend to reduce or displace animal protein as well as “bad” fats such as trans fat in a dish or meal.

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e-Cigarettes: boon or bane?

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

IMG_01_240X240With sales of electronic cigarettes, or “e-cigarettes,” going up and expected to hit 1.5 billion dollars this year, concerns over potential health risks of using the trendy devices are also gaining momentum and political clout.

An article in Chemical and Engineering News (C and EN), the weekly magazine of the American Chemical Society, delves into what scientists and regulators are doing about e-cigarettes, which are now being cleverly marketed under more appealing names such as hookah pens and vape pipes.

The battery-powered devices deliver an inhalable vapor, with or without nicotine. Deirdre Lockwood , a C and EN contributing editor, notes that they are often viewed as a safer-and tastier-alternative to smoking cigarettes.

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Eat sensibly, eat often and eat local: Rujuta Diwekar

Monday, April 7th, 2014

DSC_0957-240x240-dec30Winner of the ‘Nutrition Award’ from Asian Institute of Gastroenterology, Rujuta Diwekar is amongst the most qualified and sought after practitioners in India today and the only nutritionist to have accreditation from Sports Dietitians, Australia.

In the plethora of diet fads and fears, Rujuta’s voice rings loud and clear, urging us to use our common sense and un-complicate the act of eating. Her two books have sold more than 5 lakh copies and have been translated in more than 5 languages. Her 3rd book on exercise “Don’t lose out, work out!” is out in the markets and already in the best seller charts. She has also made a film “Indian food wisdom & the art of eating right” which is available on dvd.

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World Health Day: Small Bite: Big Threat

Monday, April 7th, 2014

7th April 2014 is known as World Health Day. The topic this year is vector-borne diseases. Out of the 17 diseases on its list, the Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases prioritizes seven vector-borne diseases. These are dengue, Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis, the Leishmaniases, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis and schistosomiasis.

Today, more than half of the world’s population is at risk from vector-borne diseases.

What are vector borne diseases?
Vectors are organisms that transmit pathogens and parasites from one infected person (or animal) to another, causing serious diseases in human populations. These diseases are commonly found in tropical and sub-tropical regions and places where access to safe drinking-water and sanitation systems is problematic.

Vector-borne diseases account for 17% of the estimated global burden of all infectious diseases. The most deadly vector-borne disease, malaria, caused an estimated 627 000 deaths in 2012.

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