Posts Tagged ‘Heart disease’

Drinking Earl Grey tea helps prevent heart disease

Friday, April 11th, 2014

pic_02_240x240_apr11A new study has revealed that drinking Earl Grey tea could help tackle heart disease .

According to the researchers, the key ingredient in Earl Grey tea, bergamot extract, was found to lower cholesterol and guard against a disease that causes more than a quarter of all deaths in the UK.

The study revealed that the fragrant Mediterranean fruit, which gives Earl Grey its unique flavour, contains enzymes known as HMGF (hydroxy methyl glutaryl flavonones), which can attack proteins in the body known to contribute to cardiovascular disease.

The scientists added that a dietary supplement of HMGF could be just as effective as statins in combating low-density proteins (LDL) or “bad” cholesterol.

The study was published in the Journal of Functional Foods.

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Turmeric: The new superfood!

Friday, April 11th, 2014

pic_03_240x240_apr11Researchers have said that turmeric could protect against a host of brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr Michael Murray, co-author of the Textbook of Natural Medicine and one of the world’s leading authorities on natural medicine, said that various spices in Indian curries are used not only for their flavour, also but for their medicinal properties, News.com.au reported.

He said that since inflammation is a major factor in the development of most chronic degenerative diseases including cardiovascular disease, allergies, type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease, curcumin’s anti-inflammatory power holds great promise in all of these conditions and many more.

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Heart responds differently to exercise in men and women

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

crop2_240x240_2apr14Researchers have said that the formula for peak exercise heart rate that doctors have used for decades to diagnose heart conditions may be flawed as it does not account for differences between men and women.

The simple formula of “220 minus age” has been widely used to calculate the maximum number of heart beats per minute a person can achieve.

Many people use it to derive their target heart rate during a workout. Doctors use it to determine how hard a patient should exercise during a common diagnostic test known as the exercise stress test.

After analyzing more than 25,000 stress tests, the researchers found significant differences between men and women and developed an updated formula to reflect those nuances.

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Knowing your heart age could help prevent CVD

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

arti_06_240x240_mar27Thanks to the identification of the common risk factors involved and national public health initiatives, heart disease deaths have almost halved over the past 40-50 years, especially in high income countries.

But “despite impressive progress, there is much still to be achieved in the prevention and management of cardiovascular care, with no room for complacency,” according to researchers.

CVD “is by far and away the leading cause of deaths worldwide,” and is “rampant” in low and middle income countries, while the surge in obesity and diabetes threatens to overturn the steady decline made in CVD prevalence, the researchers said.

And rates of heart disease continue to vary substantially depending on where a person lives and how well off s/he is.

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Exercise reduces insulin resistance: Dr. Kovil

Monday, March 24th, 2014

crop2_240x240_24mar14Dr. Rajiv Kovil is a Consultant Diabetologist at Dr. Kovil’s Diabetes Care Centre, the first Preventive Diabetes Centre & Diabetic Foot Clinic in Mumbai, KLS Memorial Hospital and Holy Spirit Hospital among others. He is a founder member of United Diabetes Forum, a forum of practising diabetologists in India. He has also written various articles on diabetes for medical journals such as Asian Journal of Diabetology and Medical Image.

His Preventive Diabetes Centre & Diabetic Foot Clinic is an initiative to provide preventive diabetic measures as well as to function as a specialized Foot Clinic for diabetic patients not only in terms of equipment but more importantly in terms of expertise.

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Curbing animal protein intake may up longevity

Friday, March 7th, 2014

food_240x240_mar6Two groups of researchers have claimed in two different studies that consuming high-quality animal protein in moderation is one of the keys to a long and healthy life.

The first study suggests that consuming moderate to high levels of animal protein prompts a major increase in cancer risk and mortality in middle-aged adults, while elderly individuals have the opposite result.

Meanwhile, the second team of researchers found that a high-protein, low-carb diet led to a shorter lifespan in mice. Both studies find that not all calories are created equal-diet composition and animal protein intake are key players in overall health and longevity.

University of Southern California’s Dr. Valter Longo , who is the senior author of one of the papers, said that the team studied mice and humans and provide convincing evidence that a high-protein diet-particularly if the proteins are derived from animals-is nearly as bad as smoking for health.

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Tips to improve your heart health

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

image_1_240x240mar04Even though heart disease remains the leading cause of death, the good news is that it can be prevented.

Judith Mackall, MD, Cardiologist at University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio, offers three tips for men and women to help improve their heart health and reduce the risk of developing heart disease.

She advises thirty minutes of moderate exercise every day, which can have a big impact on heart health.

If 30 minutes is too much time to dedicate all at once, no problem! Breaking up exercise into ten minute increments, three times a day, has just as great an effect. In fact, within ten weeks, results have shown that an individual’s cholesterol numbers will improve, blood pressure will come down, and weight will decrease.

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Strawberries boost heart health by lowering LDL

Friday, February 28th, 2014

art_02_240x240A team of researchers has found that incorporating antioxidant-rich strawberries into a daily diet may help lower cholesterol and boost cardiovascular health.

A team of volunteers ate half a kilo of strawberries a day for a month to see whether it altered their blood parameters in any way. At the end of this unusual treatment, it was found that their levels of bad cholesterol and triglycerides reduced significantly.

Researchers from the Universita Politecnica delle Marche (UNIVPM, Italy), together with colleagues from the Universities of Salamanca, Granada and Seville (Spain), set up an experiment in which they added 500 g of strawberries to the daily diets of 23 healthy volunteers over a month.

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How red wine is good for your heart

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

image_1_240x240feb20A new study has revealed red wine and dark chocolate not only taste great, but also have heart-healthy components.

Red wine contains resveratrol, which has been found to lower blood sugar and LDL or “bad” cholesterol. It also is a source of catechins, which can help improve HDL or “good” cholesterol and polyphenols, which may prevent the formation of toxic plaque that leads to Alzheimer’s disease.

Dark chocolate with a cocoa content of 70 percent or higher is rich in flavonoids, which help prevent the buildup of plaque in the arteries. It also boosts the immune system and contains cancer-fighting enzymes.

According to Loyola University Health System preventive heart specialist Sara Sirna , other items that top the list of heart-healthy foods include nuts, fish, flaxseeds, oatmeal, black or kidney beans, walnuts and almonds and berries.

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Eating citrus foods may reduce stroke risk

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

saf02_240x240_feb17A new study has revealed that eating citrus foods that contain vitamin C may reduce your risk of the most common type of hemorrhagic stroke.

Vitamin C is found in fruits and vegetables such as oranges, papaya, peppers, broccoli and strawberries.

The study involved 65 people who had experienced an intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke, or a blood vessel rupture inside the brain. They were compared to 65 healthy people.

Participants were tested for the levels of vitamin C in their blood. Forty-one percent of cases had normal levels of vitamin C, 45 percent showed depleted levels of vitamin C and 14 percent were considered deficient of the vitamin.

“Our results show that vitamin C deficiency should be considered a risk factor for this severe type of stroke , as were high blood pressure, drinking alcohol and being overweight in our study,” study author Stephane Vannier , MD, with Pontchaillou University Hospital in Rennes, France, said.

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