Posts Tagged ‘Hypertension’

Metabolic Syndrome: A growing epidemic in a corporate setting

Friday, April 11th, 2014

pic_02_240x240Indeed, today poor fitness, metabolic crisis and stress have reduced proficiency and well being in all levels of corporate professionals.

Statistics indicate that 90% of the employees show a distorted blood profile and metabolic syndrome in corporate settings. Health education is poor and awareness negligible, travelling and eating at restaurants is imperative in some settings. A sedentary lifestyle, stress and absence of well-being often come free with attractive corporate packages.

In such a scenario, it becomes imperative that corporate introduce integrated Lifestyle medicine and holistic interventions with components of nutrition therapy, exercise science, cognitive behaviour strategies and other alternative approaches for their employees. Health Promotion as well as holistic programs fixing the widely prevalent metabolic syndrome, as well as providing thorough skills to eat right on tours, work on portion size, perform simple exercises, especially breathing exercise regimens and muscle stimulation routines, while travelling need to be accessible by employees of all cadre.

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Heart responds differently to exercise in men and women

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

crop2_240x240_2apr14Researchers have said that the formula for peak exercise heart rate that doctors have used for decades to diagnose heart conditions may be flawed as it does not account for differences between men and women.

The simple formula of “220 minus age” has been widely used to calculate the maximum number of heart beats per minute a person can achieve.

Many people use it to derive their target heart rate during a workout. Doctors use it to determine how hard a patient should exercise during a common diagnostic test known as the exercise stress test.

After analyzing more than 25,000 stress tests, the researchers found significant differences between men and women and developed an updated formula to reflect those nuances.

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Knowing your heart age could help prevent CVD

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

arti_06_240x240_mar27Thanks to the identification of the common risk factors involved and national public health initiatives, heart disease deaths have almost halved over the past 40-50 years, especially in high income countries.

But “despite impressive progress, there is much still to be achieved in the prevention and management of cardiovascular care, with no room for complacency,” according to researchers.

CVD “is by far and away the leading cause of deaths worldwide,” and is “rampant” in low and middle income countries, while the surge in obesity and diabetes threatens to overturn the steady decline made in CVD prevalence, the researchers said.

And rates of heart disease continue to vary substantially depending on where a person lives and how well off s/he is.

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Flavoring food with herbs helps lower salt intake

Friday, March 21st, 2014

crop1_240x240_21mar14A new study has found that teaching people how to flavor food with and herbs is considerably more effective at lowering salt intake.

According to the research, people who had cooking lessons had less salt in their diet and learning to use seasonings is the first step to dietary change.

Cheryl Anderson, lead author of the study and associate professor in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California San Diego, said that helping people cook differently gave them control over their diet.

Anderson added that salt is abundant in the food supply and the average sodium level for Americans is very high and the use of a behavioral intervention where people learn how to use spices and herbs and less salt in their daily lives can help regulate that.

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Consumption of energy drinks linked to depression in teens

Monday, March 10th, 2014

Soft-Drinks_240x240_mar10A new study has found that consumption of energy drinks among teenagers may be linked with poor mental health and substance use.

Researchers are calling for limits on teen’s access to the drinks and reduction in the amount of the caffeine in each can.

The paper by researchers at the University of Waterloo and Dalhousie University, found that high school students prone to depression as well as those who smoke marijuana or drink alcohol are more likely to consume energy drinks than their peers.

“While it remains unclear why these associations exist, the trend is a concern because of the high rate of consumption among teenagers,” Sunday Azagba, a researcher at the Propel Centre for Population Health Impact at the University of Waterloo and lead author on the paper, said.

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How red wine is good for your heart

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

image_1_240x240feb20A new study has revealed red wine and dark chocolate not only taste great, but also have heart-healthy components.

Red wine contains resveratrol, which has been found to lower blood sugar and LDL or “bad” cholesterol. It also is a source of catechins, which can help improve HDL or “good” cholesterol and polyphenols, which may prevent the formation of toxic plaque that leads to Alzheimer’s disease.

Dark chocolate with a cocoa content of 70 percent or higher is rich in flavonoids, which help prevent the buildup of plaque in the arteries. It also boosts the immune system and contains cancer-fighting enzymes.

According to Loyola University Health System preventive heart specialist Sara Sirna , other items that top the list of heart-healthy foods include nuts, fish, flaxseeds, oatmeal, black or kidney beans, walnuts and almonds and berries.

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Eating citrus foods may reduce stroke risk

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

saf02_240x240_feb17A new study has revealed that eating citrus foods that contain vitamin C may reduce your risk of the most common type of hemorrhagic stroke.

Vitamin C is found in fruits and vegetables such as oranges, papaya, peppers, broccoli and strawberries.

The study involved 65 people who had experienced an intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke, or a blood vessel rupture inside the brain. They were compared to 65 healthy people.

Participants were tested for the levels of vitamin C in their blood. Forty-one percent of cases had normal levels of vitamin C, 45 percent showed depleted levels of vitamin C and 14 percent were considered deficient of the vitamin.

“Our results show that vitamin C deficiency should be considered a risk factor for this severe type of stroke , as were high blood pressure, drinking alcohol and being overweight in our study,” study author Stephane Vannier , MD, with Pontchaillou University Hospital in Rennes, France, said.

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Know these five numbers to keep your heart healthy

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

saf_03_240x240_feb12Apart from pass codes, phone numbers, social security numbers, clothing sizes and addresses, heart experts at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center suggest that there are five more you need to know to help keep your cardiovascular system healthy.

“These are the numbers doctors use to assess someone’s risk for getting heart disease, both short term and throughout their lifetime,” Dr. Martha Gulati, director of preventive cardiology and women’s cardiovascular health at Ohio State’s Ross Heart Hospital, said.

“When you monitor these numbers, you are empowered to work with your doctor to improve your heart health,” she said.

Gulati said that the most important numbers to know are blood pressure levels, Body Mass Index, waist circumference, cholesterol levels and blood sugar levels.

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Enjoying life helps to keep you fit

Friday, January 24th, 2014

Family-Cycling_240x240A new study has revealed that people who enjoy life maintain better physical function in daily activities and keep up faster walking speeds as they age, compared with people who enjoy life less.

A study of 3199 men and women aged 60 years or over living in England looked at the link between positive well-being and physical well-being, following participants over 8 years.

Researchers Dr. Andrew Steptoe said the study showed that older people who are happier and enjoy life more show slower declines in physical function as they age.

“They are less likely to develop impairments in activities of daily living such as dressing or getting in or out of bed, and their walking speed declines at a slower rate than those who enjoy life less,” Steptoe added.

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Smoking associated with wide range of diseases

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

food03_240x240_jan20A new report by the US surgeon general has increased the list of diseases associated with cigarettes.

The 980-page, research-based report says smoking could cause liver and colorectal cancer, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, impaired immune function, ectopic pregnancy and erectile dysfunction, Politico reported.

In the report, acting Surgeon General Boris Lushniak described a “robust body of evidence”, which has accumulated over the past 50 years, and shown the consequences of smoking and smoke exposure across a range of diseases and organ systems.

According to the report, the risk for developing diabetes is particularly significant: as much as 40 per cent higher among smokers compared to non-smokers.

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